Public Works

Water & Wastewater

The Public Works Water and Wastewater division is responsible for testing and maintaining the water and wastewater lines in the City of Euless. If you have a question or concern about the water in Euless, call 817-685-1580.

Frequently Asked Questions

Where do we get our drinking water?

Our drinking water is obtained from a combination of surface and ground water sources. The primary source is supplied by the Trinity River Authority and originates from two lakes, Cedar Creek Reservoir and Richland Chambers Reservoir, located in east Texas.

Water is pumped from these two lakes to Lake Arlington, then on to the water treatment plant and eventually delivered to the cities of Euless, Bedford, Colleyville, Grapevine and North Richland Hills. 

In addition, our secondary source of water is from City of Euless water wells, which tap into the Trinity Aquifer.

It rained in Euless last week. Why are we still under watering restrictions?

Watering restrictions are determined by the combined supply in the Tarrant Regional Water District (TRWD) reservoir system. 

Graph of Current Water Levels
94 %
as of Dec 10, 2016
93 %
100 %

Cedar Creek Reservoir and Richland Chambers Reservoir, along with several others, make up the Tarrant Regional Water District (TRWD) and are used to supply 98% of all drinking water to Tarrant County residents and businesses.

If the reservoirs in this system do not have ample water supplies to meet demand, usage must be restricted to protect our drinking water resources.

What determines watering restrictions?

The combined supply in the Tarrant Regional Water District (TRWD) reservoir system determines the triggering conditions for our drought stages.

You will notice the graphic on the right that displays the current combined lake levels and what stage of the drought contingency plan Euless is currently observing.

When the capacity of the reservoir system is above 75%, residents are not under any restrictions, but are strongly encouraged to conserve water, especially outdoors.

Drought Contingency Plan Stages

Stage One: Water Watch – below 75%

This may be implemented for a number of reasons. The primary reason typically being that the water supply in the reservoir system is inadequate to meet demand. Water users will limit landscape watering to two days a week and are prohibited from using water to hose paved areas, buildings or using water in a manner that allows runoff to occur.

Stage Two: Water Warning – below 60%

Stage Two is a sign of more dire circumstances. During this stage water users are limited to watering once a week and are prohibited from using water for dust control, operation of ornamental fountains or ponds (except where necessary to support aquatic life) and are encouraged to wait to establish new landscaping.

Stage Three: Water Emergency – below 45%

This stage of the drought contingency plan is as stated, a water emergency. When lakes are half empty, our valuable drinking water is at stake. Water users may not irrigate with the exception of foundations and trees for limited periods of time, may not establish new landscaping, washing of vehicles is strictly limited, draining and refilling pools is prohibited and the operation of fountains and ponds (except where necessary to support aquatic life) is prohibited.

Additional Resources

For more information about water conservation use these resources.